Paymaster Series 8000 Ribbon Writer

IMG 7737 Paymaster Series 8000 Ribbon Writer IMG 7740 Paymaster Series 8000 Ribbon WriterOk, I admit it. I finally met the Checkwriter I couldn’t resist.  As a thrift-huntin’ typewriter collector, I occasionally see a Paymaster Checkwriter sitting in the same general area that typewriters are stashed. Although always intrigued and tempted by these neat very mono-purpose printing machines, I’ve always held back on buying one (and you do only need one, if you need any at all) mainly because they are invariably priced much higher than typewriters, and also because every one I’ve seen up until now has been inked with a messy pad.

IMG 7741 Paymaster Series 8000 Ribbon Writer IMG 7747 Paymaster Series 8000 Ribbon WriterThe Series 8000 Ribbon-Writer however, as the name suggests, is inked with a ribbon, just like a typewriter. But it ain’t no typewriter ribbon in there – the Ribbon-Writer takes a ribbon nearly 4 inches wide. That ribbon spool makes the ribbons on old upstroke typewriters look wee and dinky.

IMG 7744 Paymaster Series 8000 Ribbon Writer
Paymaster Series 8000 Ribbon Writer #8N149809

IMG 7749 Paymaster Series 8000 Ribbon Writer IMG 7750 Paymaster Series 8000 Ribbon WriterThe ribbon was just one major reason why I picked this particular one as my personal checkwriter, though. The condition is beautiful and it functions perfectly.  I’ve been keeping an eye on this one in the Deseret Collectibles case for weeks, as it started out priced at $50, and grew more tempted as the price kept dropping without any buyers. When the price tag hit $10, I finally dropped the dime. Another important consideration to check before buying: some of these machines have specially-ordered impression plates that emboss the name of the company that owned it on your checks. You want to make a test print before buying to see what gets printed. If you’re gonna use it, make sure it just prints the generic “The Sum”.

IMG 7751 Paymaster Series 8000 Ribbon Writer
CLEAR/LOCKED lever in operation. it controls whether the number you set is cleared or not after the check is imprinted. That’s it.
IMG 7755 Paymaster Series 8000 Ribbon Writer
Set the amount of the check to be written using the front levers.
IMG 7756 Paymaster Series 8000 Ribbon Writer
Write out the Payee of your check. Do this first because…
IMG 7753 Paymaster Series 8000 Ribbon Writer
This lever sets whether or not the word “BONDED” is embossed over the payee name on the check. This prevents the payee name from being altered.
IMG 7759 Paymaster Series 8000 Ribbon Writer
KA-CHUNK! Note the number levers being reset to 0.00 after the check is imprinted.
IMG 7768 Paymaster Series 8000 Ribbon Writer
And now you have a check, bottom one is “BONDED” embossed, top one isn’t. My checks are gonna be real cool from now on.

Adventures of The Archivist, Part One.

2014 10 12a Adventures of The Archivist, Part One.

IMG 7695 Adventures of The Archivist, Part One.
Weapon of Choice: Perkk, a 1949 Royal Quiet Deluxe, loaded with a vintage T6 Brown Silk Ribbon

2014 10 12b Adventures of The Archivist, Part One.

IMG 7693 Adventures of The Archivist, Part One.
“Spelunkers”, 158 grain soft-lead target full-wadcutters, loaded ass-backwards with the skirt to front. Named for the sound they make when hitting soft South American Nazi Domain Pirate flesh. Elmer Keith would be proud.

2014 10 12c Adventures of The Archivist, Part One.

IMG 7687 Adventures of The Archivist, Part One.
Yay, my favorite Cuban cigarillos are everywhere in Brazil! :D Can’t risk dry socket by smoking them, though. ):

2014 10 12d Adventures of The Archivist, Part One.

IMG 7682 Adventures of The Archivist, Part One.
For the jungle, you pack light and load flexible. Shotshell cuz, you know, snakes… :P

2014 10 12e Adventures of The Archivist, Part One.

That touch of Silk…

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Thunderbird II, my favorite Brother JP-1, getting it’s silk ribbon transplant…

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Heh, has anyone seen a two-color Selectric ribbon before?
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The “ribbon position selector on a model 72 isn’t super-easy to get at and switch on the run, but it does work.

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“The element is solid black with no markings on it other than what looks like the manufacturer logo – ELEMENTE
The lever design is unique and works smoothly compared to an IBM design. There is no name of the font or the pitch. The element is black plastic, but it looks very dark green under the light.”

While my original impression was that the two fractional characters when typed together (similar to the smiley face on GP “Sunshine Script” elements) made a logo that looked like the Union 76 oil company logo, the Professor remarked that it looks more like a logo that was commonly used during the USA Bicentennial celebrations of 1976, and I agree. Perhaps this strange element was a special run for the ’76 celebrations, to capitalize on American fervor for colonial-style stuff during that year or so? The typeface’s lowercase does look very German Fraktur-like, while the uppercase seems more English-language calligraphic in style, and more readable than true Fraktur. Anyone have any experience with this typeface/ball care to comment?

2014 10 05f That touch of Silk...And, in other Typewriter Database news, there is now a page for Xerox – culled from product introduction dates mentioned in a 1987 Xerox Factbook. All you Memorywriter wedge owners now have *something* to go by, which is better than what we had, which was *nothing at all*. :D

A Typecast Blog by The Right Reverend Theodore Munk